Friday, January 20, 2012

Qigong and the Principles of T'ai Chi. Part I


Qigong is based on the principles of T'ai Chi, maintaining circular continuity and on establishing a center between Yin/Yang dualities: substantial and insubstantial, full and empty, heavy and light, etc. The T'ai Chi, or Supreme Ultimate, provides the source of movement and stillness, and it births Yin and Yang. Our center provides a middle ground between excesses and deficiencies. Our movement from the center allows Yin and Yang to act independently. Stillness allows the two to merge into unity.

Establishing one's center requires mindful and persistent practice. Through diligent practice it is possible to understand one's energy field and attain spiritual enlightenment. Supernatural knowledge can be attained.

How can this occur? Developing familiarity with your intrinsic "empty and full" dualities will facilitate "letting go." It is this emptying which allows you to become sensitive. In learning a qigong form, the mind is persistently returned to what the body is doing. This introduces the practitioner to tranquility, it quietens and relaxes the mind, calming one's emotional nature.

6 comments:

  1. hello der,

    My girl friend is suffering from breast cancer, and i have full faith on qigong healing. Can you please give me some info abot gigong healers in china whom i should approach, should I go to shoalin temple itself, kindly help me.. thanks

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    Replies
    1. Visit the page by Master Luke Chan, who teaches ChiLel Qigong. You fly to Hong Kong and then take a ferry to the city where he teaches. http://www.chilel.com/study_in_china.html

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    2. If you live in the United States, a trip to China may not be necessary, as Luke's brother Frank Chan, has a retreat center in California. Here is the contact information: Phone: 916 772-0868 E-Mail: lukechan@chilel.com

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  2. You may enjoy the something I just posted on my blog about successful experiments in the science of qigong.

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    Replies
    1. I have read it and I recommend others to do the same.

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  3. In the ancient Chinese health system there was an infrequent need for surgery, unless an emergency arose. In fact, the Chinese did not have a deep understanding of physical anatomy as they do now, but primarily used the "meridians" or energy channels in the body as a means for healing.

    Ilchi Lee Books

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